Roadside Geology of Wisconsin


Roadside Geology of Wisconsin

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GB-30010001
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1.45 lbs
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$20.00
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$15.00 (Save 25%)

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Robert H. Dott, Jr., and John W. Attig wrote Roadside Geology of Wisconsin to help residents and visitors alike "envision mastodons roaming in front of glaciers 12,000 years ago, feel storm waves pounding sea cliffs 500 million years ago, and hear volcanoes exploding 1,900 million years ago." With lively prose, detailed maps, black-and-white photographs, and shaded-relief images, the authors succeed in their goal: unraveling the 2,800 million years of geologic history recorded in Wisconsin's rocks.

Introductory sections describe the geology of each region, and thirty-five road guides locate and interpret the rocks, sediments, and landforms visible from the state's highways, including the Great River Road in the Mississippi Valley. Roadside Geology of Wisconsin delves further into the geologic history of specific sites such as Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, the Wisconsin Dells, the geologically renowned Baraboo Hills, and more than twenty-five state parks. Features of and access points to the Ice Age National Scenic Trail are noted.

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    Due to limited product on hand: Limit One (1) per customer.

    Due to increasing cost of leather it is no longer cost effective to manufacture the leather sheaths.

    Estwing has replaced the leather sheath with nylon sheaths manufactured with the same basic design.

    Estwing Leather Sheath for Pointed Tip Rock Hammers

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    (I placed this on the site when the sheathshad a tight fit. It's still handy information." Hint: to make it easier to use this sheath use products like Vaseline, mink oil, saddle soap and even soap to help break it in. If you've recently broken in a baseball glove you may have some Rawlings Glovolium and Easton Glove oil around. Don't over do it. Do a web search on breaking in a baseball glove to find out how they do it.

     

    I still don't recommend using the Estwing Leather Sheaths in any case. I sell them because some customers insist on having a sheath to protect things from the hammers. They're OK for storage but Amateur Geologist never carries one into the field. Use a holster.

    Did I mention that these sheaths are just too difficult to use.

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