Roadside Geology of Indiana


Roadside Geology of Indiana

Details

SKU
GB-19010001
In stock
1 available
Weight
1.40 lbs
Retail Price
$20.00
Our Internet Price
$15.00 (Save 25%)

Options

Quantity
(from 1 to 1)


Hundreds of millions of years ago, warm coral-rich seas deposited mud on the ocean floor, and in time it became limestone --the cornerstone of Indiana geology. Layered with sandstone and shale, the limestone preserves fossils, dissolves along fractures, traps natural gas, and is the source of famous building stones. Roadside Geology of Indiana explores the geologic features visible along the state's highways from Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in the north to Wyandotte Caves in the south. As you travel across Indiana's time-worn topography, discover fossilized reefs, mastodon skeletons, geodes, ancient bedrock valleys, and the site of a mysterious meteorite impact. Authors Mark J. Camp and Graham T. Richardson divide Indiana into four geographically distinct regions: the arched limestones of the southeastern hills, the karst topography of the south, the coal-bearing rocks of the Wabash lowlands, and the glacially buried north. Numerous maps and cross sections reveal Indiana's geology for easy exploration.
  • Customers Also Bought

  • Customer Reviews

  • Send to Friend

  • Roadside Geology of Oregon

    Until about 200 million years ago, the western margin of North America lay to the east, along the present Idaho border, and a broad coastal plain spread westward into Oregon. The rest of the state was ocean floor. Then the continent began moving slowly westward away from Europe and the floor of the Pacific Ocean began sliding beneath the western edge. That is what created Oregon, and this book tells how it happened.
    GB-33010001
    $12.00
  • Roadside Geology of New Mexico

    The Land of Enchantment, New Mexico is as varied in its scenery as its nickname suggests. With desert lowlands in the south and high, hoary peaks in the north, with rugged volcanic uplands and colorful plateaus, with high plains along its eastern border, and with a great rift valley that quite literally slashes the state in two, New Mexico presents many faces to its residents and visitors--faces that can largely be laid at the doorstep of the state's varied geology.
    GB-47010001
    $15.00
  • Northeast Treasure Hunters Gems & Minerals Guide

    This guides offer state-by-state details on more than 250
    gems and minerals the U.S. has to offer and affordable fee-dig sites where they can be found. Includes maps, illustrations and B/W photos.
    GB-55000003
    $9.56
  • DK Pockets Fossils

    GB-80000038
    $4.61
  • Guide For Weekend Prospectors : Easy Tests

    Author Sid Wayland examines common minerals and elements, discussing their visible properties and chemical makeups as well as how to identify specimens through a number of tests that can be performed at home or in the field.
    GB-80000111
    $4.38
  • Mineral Hardness Scale Ruler

    The Mineral Hardness Ruler is a stimulating visual aid, educates in one phase of mineralogy, and provides the standard ruler measurement scales needed in classes.


    Rockhounds, mineral enthusiasts, students, teachers, geologists, and any one interested in rocks and minerals will find the Mineral Hardness Ruler a handy visual aid for quick information on mineral hardness.



    The two-sided, flexible, glossy, vinyl ruler consists of five scales: three measurement scales and two mineral hardness scales. The measurement scales are in standard ruler measurements of tenths of inches, sixteenths of inches, and millimeters. Mohs' relative hardness numbers are integrated into the inch scales, while a separate scale exists for an absolute mineral hardness scale by Rosiwal.


    On one side of the ruler are pictures of the ten common minerals, in full color, selected by Mohs for his relative hardness scale. On the reverse side of the ruler are six common items with their relative hardnesses. These items, along with known minerals, can be used as a handy field kit to test the relative hardness of an unknown mineral.


    Hardness is one property of a mineral that can be used to distinguish among similar minerals. A given mineral can scratch any other mineral of the same or softer hardness. Over a hundred years ago, the German mineralogist Frederick Mohs devised the relative hardness scale that has found favor with mineralogists for over a century. Others, such as Rosiwal, formed absolute hardness scales using the same minerals as Mohs. For example, diamond, the hardest substance in Nature is not twice as hard as apatite, 10 versus 5, but over twenty thousand times as hard, 140,000 versus 6.5.

    FG-00000005
    $3.17
  • AAPG Great Lakes Geological Highway Map (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin)

    Learn more about the geological history of the rocks around you! This colorful, educational map presents state/regional surface rock outcrop information?age, depositional environment, rock type, and names of formations. Includes major highways, towns, and landmarks. Printed on a single sheet and folded to glove compartment size, has a stratigraphic column by state, mileage charts. Scale: 1 inch=30 miles. Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin.
    GM-5500671
    $12.00
  • Estwing Supreme 20 oz Chisel Edge Rock Hammer E3-20PC

    Estwing Supreme 20 oz Chisel Edge Rock Hammer E3-20PC

    Chisel edge rock hammers are typically used when you want to split layers of rock apart when looking for fossils.

    Head Width 6 7/8 inches
    Overall Length 11 inches
    Head Weight 20 ounces
    Total Weight 1 pound 12 ounces

    Limit; Two Estwing Supreme 20 oz Chisel Edge Rock Hammer E3-20PC per Order

    HW-01000020
    $30.95
  • Estwing Leather Sheath for Pointed Tip Rock Hammers #3

    Due to limited product on hand: Limit One (1) per customer.

    Due to increasing cost of leather it is no longer cost effective to manufacture the leather sheaths.

    Estwing has replaced the leather sheath with nylon sheaths manufactured with the same basic design.

    Estwing Leather Sheath for Pointed Tip Rock Hammers

    New model. The sheath now has a "relaxed fit" making it easier to use in the field as well as working with more hammers.

    Fits Estwing Pointed Tip Rock Hammers. Now fits the Estwing Supreme 24oz Big Face Pointed Tip Rock Hammer and the Valley Soft-Touch 20oz Pointed Tip Rock Hammer.

    Leather snap case for the Estwing 24 oz, 22 oz, 13 oz, and 14 oz Rock Picks. Difficult to use until well broken in. We recommend the Gfeller Casemakers sheaths and holsters, especially the holsters. The Gfeller sheaths are sized better and their also pre-shaped to fit the hammers.

     

    (I placed this on the site when the sheathshad a tight fit. It's still handy information." Hint: to make it easier to use this sheath use products like Vaseline, mink oil, saddle soap and even soap to help break it in. If you've recently broken in a baseball glove you may have some Rawlings Glovolium and Easton Glove oil around. Don't over do it. Do a web search on breaking in a baseball glove to find out how they do it.

     

    I still don't recommend using the Estwing Leather Sheaths in any case. I sell them because some customers insist on having a sheath to protect things from the hammers. They're OK for storage but Amateur Geologist never carries one into the field. Use a holster.

    Did I mention that these sheaths are just too difficult to use.

    HW-01000052
    $49.99

Customer Reviews

There have been no reviews for this product.

  Sign in to post a review

: *
: *
: *
Type the characters you see in the picture:


*

Categories

Manufacturers

Recently Viewed