Special offers

Rock and Rock-Forming Minerals

Rock and Rock-Forming Minerals


In stock
22 available
2.10 lbs
Retail Price
Our Internet Price
$25.50 (Save 15%)


(from 1 to 22)

24 specimens, 1 1/4", including six each of the following: rock-forming minerals, igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. Also includes a study guide.



Minerals are naturally occurring chemical compounds or elements found in the earth's crust and are the building blocks of rocks. Rocks may contain only a single mineral, but usually they contain a mixture of many minerals.

1. Quartz - Silicon dioxide, or quartz, is the most common mineral in the earth's crust.
2. Feldspar var. Microcline - This potassium aluminum silicate is common in pegmatites and in some metamorphic rocks.
3. Mica var. Muscovite - A potassium aluminum silicate that is common in granite pegmatites. Muscovite is also common in metamorphic rocks.
4. Mica var. Biotite - Some granites, schists, and gneisses contain this iron-bearing potassium aluminum silicate.
5. Calcite - Calcium carbonate is the major constituent of limestones and marbles.
6. Hornblende - This complex silicate is common in metamorphic and some igneous rocks.


Igneous rocks were once lava or magma, that is, a molten collection of minerals. The rate at which a lava or magma cools and solidifies influences rock texture, making it either fine, medium or coarse grained.

7. Pumice - A light colored volcanic rock of rhyolitic composition; the texture results from bubbles formed by escaping gasses.
8. Obsidian - Very rapid cooling caused this volcanic rock to have its glassy appearance.
9. Basalt - This dark-colored, extrusive rock occurs as large flows, dikes, and sills.
10. Rhyolite - Quartz and microcline are the major components of rhyolite.
11. Andesite - The feldspar phenocrysts present in this light-colored, extrusive rock are the result of relatively slowly cooling lava at shallow depths.
12. Granite - Feldspars and quartz made up the majority of this intrusive rock.


Metamorphic rocks are rocks that have been changed (metamorphosed), by heat, pressure, and/or hydrothermal solutions. All three rock types can be metamorphosed.

13. Mica Schist - This rock is a highly metamorphosed shale. All schists exhibit shistose structure; the generally parallel alignment of micaceous minerals.
14. Slate - The low-grade metamorphism of shale results in slate.
15. Quartzite - The "parent rock" of quartzite is quartz sandstone.
16. Gneiss - All gneisses exhibit gneissic structure, that is, alternating layers of granular minerals and micaceous minerals.
17. Garnet Schist - Shale that undergoes complete recrystallization due to metamorphism often contains high-pressure minerals such as garnet or andalusite.
18. Marble - This rock results when limestones or certain dolomites are metamorphosed.


Clastic sedimentary rocks are formed from layers of sediment (fragments of older, weathered rock) exposed to pressure. Other sedimentary rocks are of organic or chemical origin.

19. Sandstone - Quartz grains cemented together by silica, calcite or other cementing minerals make up this clastic, sedimentary rock.
20. Shale - Shale is the most abundant of all the sedimentary rocks. It is usually finely bedded and is composed of silt and/or clay size particles.
21. Arkose - This clastic, sedimentary rock is made up primarily of quartz and microcline, with lesser amounts of other minerals.
22. Conglomerate - Rounded pebbles cemented together with finer material make up this clastic, sedimentary rock.
23. Breccia - is composed of re-consolidated angular fragments of gravel and/or sand size particles.
24. Limestone - This sedimentary rock is made up primarily of calcite. Some limestones are chemical in origin, while other are clastic.
  • Customers Also Bought

  • Customer Reviews

  • Send to Friend

  • Audubon Field Guide to Familiar Rocks & Minerals

    Covers North American Rocks & Minerals. Handy pocket sized book with more than 75 full-color, full-page photographs.
  • DK Pocket Genius Rocks and Minerals : Facts at Your Fingertips

    This pocket-sized encyclopedia of nearly 200 of the most common rocks and minerals making up that make a a small part of the thousands of types of rocks and minerals making up our planet. Volcanic rocks, tough granite, sparkling diamonds, quartz, agate, meteorites, hardness, streak, color, transparency, luster, crystal shape, and facts are all this this handy encyclopedia.
    • Profiles of almost 200 rocks and minerals
    • High quality color images
    • Fascinating facts
    • Data section, Periodic Table of Elements, glossary and index.
  • Discover Nature in the Rocks: Things to Know and Things to Do

    Combines dozens of simple, non-intrusive activities with detailed illustrations and informative text to provide a friendly introduction to hands-on study of rocks and the earth. Perfect for adults and children.
  • Mathematics : A Very Short Introduction

    The aim of this book is to explain, carefully but not technically, the differences between advanced, research-level mathematics, and the sort of mathematics we learn at school. The most fundamental differences are philosophical, and readers of this book will emerge with a clearer understanding of paradoxical-sounding concepts such as infinity, curved space, and imaginary numbers. The first few chapters are about general aspects of mathematical thought. These are followed by discussions of more specific topics, and the book closes with a chapter answering common sociological questions about the mathematical community (such as "Is it true that mathematicians burn out at the age of 25?") It is the ideal introduction for anyone who wishes to deepen their understanding of mathematics.
  • Experiments with Rocks and Minerals

    Table  of Contents

    What Have You Found?

    How Are Minerals Different from Rocks?

    Experiment 1: Making a Mineral
    Experiment 2: Making a Fossil

    What Types of Rocks Can You Find?

    Experiment 3: Making Sedimentary Rock
    Experiment 4: Making of Other Types of Rock
    Experiment 5: Testing for Limestone

    Why Are Minerals Important?

    Experiment 6: Making Different Shapes
    Experiment 7: Taking Out the Minerals

    Fun With Rocks and Minerals

    Experiment 8: Testing the Minerals in Rocks

    To Find Out More

    Important Words


    Meet the Author

  • Rocks Clever Catch

    Students say "Rocks Rock! With this Clever Catch. Test your students ability to recall important rock facts.

    This 24" inflatable ball makes learning about Rocks and their properties a bunch of fun! Play a quick game by tossing the ball back and forth between two students or a group, and wherever the students left thumb lands is the question that gets answered!! Teacher?s answers and instructions for game play are included on the enclosed answer sheet. Examples of the 96 questions:

    • TRUE OR FALSE: The Hawaiian Islands are made entirely of coral rock.

    • What sedimentary rock is made from lime oozes?

    • TRUE OR FALSE: Some of the world's most beatiful gems grew in metamorphic

    • Name and igneous rock that floats in water.

    • What makes the rocks in a stream smooth and round?

    • TRUE OR FALSE: Rocks contain clues that can help detemine their origins?

    • The first rocks on earth were _____?

    • Limestone consists chiefly of the mineral _____?

    • TRUE OR FALSE: Magma that cooled slowly would have big crystals?

    • TRUE OR FALSE: The layered rocks in the Grand Canyon are mostly sedimentary.

    • TRUE OR FALSE: Granite is so tough that it never weathers.

    • Pebbles that are held together by a binding material such as cement are

      • A. volcanic rocks
      • B. plutonic rocks
      • C. fossilized rocks
      • D. conglomerate rocks

  • Minerals Clever Catch

    This 24" inflatable ball makes learning about Minerals and their properties a bunch of fun! Play a quick game by tossing the ball back and forth between two students or a group, and wherever the students left thumb lands is the question that gets answered!!
    Teacher?s answers and instructions for game play are included on the enclosed answer sheet. Examples of the 95 questions on the ball:

    • Pyrite has what interesting nickname?

    • Both diamon and graphite are mineral forms of the element ______?

    • True or False: Silver is an element and a mineral.

    • When mimerals grow into regular geometric shapes, they are called _____?

    • True of False: Infared lights make minerals fluoresce or glow.

    • Rocks are made of ______?

    • True or False: A snow flake cyrstal qualifies as a mineral.

    • True or False: Most minerals can form cyrstals under the right geologic conditions.
    • Mica comes in a variety of colors, name two.

  • Mineral Hardness Scale Ruler

    The Mineral Hardness Ruler is a stimulating visual aid, educates in one phase of mineralogy, and provides the standard ruler measurement scales needed in classes.

    Rockhounds, mineral enthusiasts, students, teachers, geologists, and any one interested in rocks and minerals will find the Mineral Hardness Ruler a handy visual aid for quick information on mineral hardness.

    The two-sided, flexible, glossy, vinyl ruler consists of five scales: three measurement scales and two mineral hardness scales. The measurement scales are in standard ruler measurements of tenths of inches, sixteenths of inches, and millimeters. Mohs' relative hardness numbers are integrated into the inch scales, while a separate scale exists for an absolute mineral hardness scale by Rosiwal.

    On one side of the ruler are pictures of the ten common minerals, in full color, selected by Mohs for his relative hardness scale. On the reverse side of the ruler are six common items with their relative hardnesses. These items, along with known minerals, can be used as a handy field kit to test the relative hardness of an unknown mineral.

    Hardness is one property of a mineral that can be used to distinguish among similar minerals. A given mineral can scratch any other mineral of the same or softer hardness. Over a hundred years ago, the German mineralogist Frederick Mohs devised the relative hardness scale that has found favor with mineralogists for over a century. Others, such as Rosiwal, formed absolute hardness scales using the same minerals as Mohs. For example, diamond, the hardest substance in Nature is not twice as hard as apatite, 10 versus 5, but over twenty thousand times as hard, 140,000 versus 6.5.

  • Pocket Naturalist Geology

    Geology, An Introduction to Familiar Rocks, Minerals, Gemstones & Fossils, is a must-have reference guide for beginners and experts alike. With this indispensable guide, learn how to identify common species of North American rocks, gems, minerals and fossils. Maps show the distribution of familiar rocks and minerals across North America. Also, included are helpful tips on how to begin, where to look, tools and methods. The Pocket Naturalist series is an introduction to common plants and animals and natural phenomena. Each pocket-sized, folding guide highlights up to 150 species and most feature a map identifying prominent sanctuaries and outstanding natural attractions. Each is laminated for durability. (31/2 X 81/4 folded, opens to 22 X 81/4, color illustrations, maps)

Customer Reviews

There have been no reviews for this product.

  Sign in to post a review

: *
: *
: *
Type the characters you see in the picture:




Recently Viewed