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Oregon Gold/Silver & Gems Maps - Then and Now

Oregon Gold/Silver & Gems Maps - Then and Now


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0.62 lbs
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(from 1 to 6)

Height 9.5 Width 6.4

This map packet includes five maps printed on both sides. Maps one through four features gold, silver and gem deposits. The fifth map, side one, shows gold occurrances taken from an 1871 map. Side 2 is a page outlining the history of Oregon's mining operations and how to find and mark your own gold deposits. Every map tells the greatest story! Reported and known occurrences of gold and silver, as well as the popular gem deposits are identified in red. Many secrets of prospecting and mining are revealed in this collection! This publication is attractively packaged for display.

Map identifies locations of: gold and silver, agate, apache tears, bloodstone, carnelian, chalcedony, feldspar, fossils, garnet, geodes, jasper, limb casts, nodules, obsidian, opal, petrified wood, quartz, rhondonite, rhyolite, sagenite, serpentine, sunstones, thunder eggs, tourmaline, jade

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