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Beauty of Banded Agates : An Exploration of Agates from Eight Major World Sites

Beauty of Banded Agates : An Exploration of Agates from Eight Major World Sites


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Gorgeously presented 12'' x 9'' photo journal of banded agate sites from around the world, with over 260 museum quality color agate photos. Explore the beautiful features of each specimen as well as the collecting histories for each site; full glossary, references and index. 160 pgs.
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